Moeen Ali’s scores second fastest century

Moeen Ali produced what has to be one of the most imperious batting displays so far in the year. It was the third ODI between England and West Indies at Bristol. West Indies kept a tight control on the match, ensuring that England were at 210/5 in the 33rd over when Ali came in. Joe Root was dismissed soon after that and Chris Woakes joined Ali in the middle. By the time Woakes got out, West Indies were battered and the confidence they showed for a better part of the innings almost completely faded away. Ali started tentatively and his first boundary came after facing his first 15 balls. He then hit another off Rovman Powell in the next over. He would only manage two more boundaries in the next two overs before the unsuspecting Miguel Cummins took the ball to bowl the 44th over. Cummins had been tormenter-in-chief until then and had taken the wickets of Joe Root, Jos Buttler and Alex Hales. Ali decided to neutralize the best West Indies had. That over produced three sixes, two fours and a total of 25 runs and Moeen Ali reached his 50 that came in 41 balls.
The audacity of Ali’s onslaught can be explained by saying that, while he reached his half century in 41 balls, he took only 12 more to reach his 100. He hit a hat-trick in the next over off Jason Holder. He then got his bit of luck when he was dropped by Chris Gayle at backward point off Jerome Taylor. West Indies were all over the place by this point, scampering around for their dear lives under Moeen Ali’s swinging bat. Ali then bid adieu to Chris Woakes who had stood dutifully at the non-strikers end all the while before crunching two sixes off Cummins and reaching his century in 53 balls. It is the second fastest 100 by and England batsman. Ali and Woakes had added 117 runs in 12 overs. Chris Gayle is playing in this match and the crowd would have come expecting such fireworks to come off his bat. While it is yet to be seen how he fares, the home crowd would be more than happy now if their team manage to get him out for cheap.
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Junaid Khan

Muhammad Junaid Khan, widely known as Junaid Khan (Pashto/Urdu: جنید خان‎; born 24 December 1989, Swabi District) is a Pakistani international cricketer who bowls left arm fast. He is the first player from Swabi to qualify for the Pakistan national cricket team,[1] and his cousin,[2] the leg-spinner Yasir Shah, followed his path later on. After an injury to Sohail Tanvir on the eve of the 2011 World Cup, Khan was called up as his replacement, with no experience in international cricket. Khan did not play in the tournament, and later made his ODI debut in April 2011. In June that year Khan represented Lancashire County Cricket Club in English domestic cricket.

Sighting

No cricket had came from Swabi before and Junaid Khan didn’t take interest in cricket initially, he played with tape-ball & was introduced to Hard ball setup by his cousin. At 16 years age Junaid Khan was measured as the fastest bowler in the NWFP Twenty/20 competition.[3] Junaid Khan said, “Some of my team mates suggested that I should go for the Under 17 trials Abbottabad. I was in two minds but afterwards I was relieved that I attended the trials, as Ehteshamuddin spotted me and told me that I had potential and that I should go to Lahore”.[4]

Early domestic career

Khan made his first-class debut on 24 January 2007 at the age of 17. Playing for Abbottabad against Multan, his first wicket was that of Majid Majeed. The match ended in a draw and Khan finished with four wickets for 57 runs (4/57).[5] For four years he took wickets consistently for his domestic team Abottabad and he was the team’s chief strike bowler, he also played for Abbottabad Falcons in the Faysal Bank Twenty20. In the 2008/09 season, Khan represented the Khan Research Laboratories cricket team and played for them in the final of the 2008/09 Quaid-i-Azam Trophy; he took a single wicket in the match as his team lost to Sialkot.[6] Khan also played for Pakistan A. In the unofficial Test series between Pakistan A and Sri Lanka A in 2010, Junaid was his team’s leading wicket-taker with ten from two matches.[7] e
He became very popular during the India-Pakistan series 2013 as he was the highest wicket taker of the series.

Selection into the Pakistan team

Following the recurrence of a knee injury to Sohail Tanvir, the uncapped Khan was added in Pakistan’s squad for the 2011 World Cup.[8] He did not play a single match in the tournament and was forced to wait for his ODI debut. When Pakistan toured the West Indies for two Tests, five ODIs, and a T20I in April and May Khan was included in the squad. On 21 April Khan made his T20I debut and went wicketless in the match.[9] Two days later, Khan, Mohammad Salman, and Hammad Azam made their ODI debuts against West Indies. Opening the bowling with Wahab Riaz, Khan conceded 49 runs from 10 overs without taking a wicket.[10] Pakistan won the series 3–2 and Khan finished with three wickets from five matches, making him the team’s fourth highest wicket-taker.[11] His first ODI wicket was that of Marlon Samuels.
In May, Pakistan toured Ireland for a two-match ODI series. Junaid was Man of the Match in the first fixture, taking four wickets for twelve runs to help Pakistan to a seven-wicket victory.[12] Pakistan won the series 2–0 and Junaid finished as the second-highest wicket-taker for the series with six at an average of 10.83.[13][14] On the advice of former Pakistan and Lancashire all-rounder Wasim Akram, Lancashire signed Junaid Khan on “modest terms” according to coach Mike Watkinson to play for them in the Friends Life t20 in June with the possibility of playing in the County Championship.[15][16] Problems with his visa meant Khan’s Lancashire debut was delayed and it was not until 27 June that he represented Lancashire for the first time in a twenty20 match.[17] Later that month Khan made his County Championship debut against Durham, stepping in for the injured Farveez Maharoof, Lancashire’s other overseas player.[18] While playing for Lancashire he took career best t20 bowling figures of 3/12 against the Derbyshire Falcons.[19] During his spell with the club, Khan received advice from Akram on how to bowl in English conditions.[20]
In August, Khan was awarded a category C central contract with the Pakistan Cricket Board; six players were in category A, eight in B, and nine (including Khan) in C.[21] When Pakistan toured Zimbabwe in September for a Test three ODIs and two T20Is, the national selectors took the opportunity to give inexperienced players an opportunity. Frontline bowlers Wahab Riaz and Umar Gul were rested and Khan was chosen as part of the squad.[22][23] Although Khan had helped Lancashire reach t20 finals days, international selection meant that Khan would be unavailable to take part and would miss the end of the season with the club.[24] On 1 September Khan made his Test debut against Zimbabwe; Pakistan’s fast bowlers in the match were inexperienced, with just one Test cap between them. The coach, Waqar Younis, commented that though Khan had a successful spell with Lancashire he still had a lot to learn as a Test bowler.[25] Khan’s sole wicket in the match, which Pakistan won, was that of batsman Craig Ervine caught and bowled.[26]
The following month, Pakistan played Sri Lanka in three Test, five ODIs, and a T20I. On the opening day of the Test series, on a pitch suited to batting, Khan took his maiden five-wicket haul in Tests.[27] Pakistan won the Test series 1–0, and Khan contributed 12 wickets to the victory. During the fifth ODI he suffered the first injury of his career: a partial tear of the muscles in his abdomen. As a result, he was unable to play for six weeks and missed Pakistan’s tour of Bangladesh in November and December.[28] His match winning performance also came during a T20 match against England. Junaid Khan got selected for the ODI squad for Australia’s tour of Pakistan in UAE, August–September 2012,[29] playing his first series against Australia. However he was excluded from the T20 side, hence being excluded from the T20 World Cup being held in Sri Lanka in September. This decision was criticised to be unjustified due to the selection of fast bowler Mohammad Sami and his recent performance against Sri Lanka.
In December 2012, Junaid Khan was again picked for the series against India and was given a chance in the ODI series and he performed superbly by picking up 4 wickets in the first match (clean bowled Sehwag, Kohli, Yuvraj) and helped in Pakistan win in first ODI and again performed superbly in the second ODI and picked up three wickets including two top order vital wickets of Gambhir and Kohli. So he has gained a place in Pakistan eleven and is considered to be one of the leading left arm fast bowlers of Pakistan who can bowl with pace, has the ability to bowl yorker and swings the bowl both ways. In November 2013, he successfully defend 9 runs in the final over in Port Elizabeth clinching Pakistan a 1 run win and Pakistan’s first bilateral ODI series win against the Proteas.
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Mohsin Hasan Khan

Mohsin Hasan Khan   born 15 March 1955, Karachi, Sindh) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 48 Tests and 75 ODIs from 1977 to 1986 mainly as an opening batsman.

Life and career

Playing in this role for Pakistan against India at Lahore in 1982–83, he scored 101 not out of Pakistan’s second-innings total of 135/1. This is the lowest team score in Test cricket to have included a century.[1]Mohsin was one of a minority of South Asian players to come to terms with conditions in Australia and England, scoring two consecutive centuries in Australia in 1983/4[2] and becoming the first Pakistani batsman to score a Test double century at Lord’s, which he did earlier in 1982.[3] He retired from international cricket to pursue a film career.
Mohsin later married Bollywood movie star Reena Roy and had a short career as an actor in the Indian film industry. He has since divorced Roy and remarried and lives in Karachi, Pakistan. He has a daughter with Reena Roy, who now lives with her mother in India. He had named his daughter Jannat, but she is now called Sanam. On 2 March 2010 Mohsin Khan was named Iqbal Qasim‘s successor as chief selector of the Pakistan national cricket team. He accepted the role turned down by fellow one-time opener Saeed Anwar. Mohsin is Pakistan’s fourth chief of selectors in the 12 months of 2009–10.[4]

Filmography

  • 1997 Mahaanta
  • 1996 Ghunghat
  • 1994 Beta
  • 1994 Madam X
  • 1993 The Elephant Walk
  • 1993 Jannat
  • 1992 Laat Saab
  • 1991 Saathi
  • 1991 Pratikar
  • 1991 Gunehgar Kaun
  • 1991 Fateh
  • 1989 Batwara
  • 1992 tyagi
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Wasim Hasan Raja

Wasim Hasan Raja  July 1952 – 23 August 2006), was a Pakistani cricketer who played in 57 Tests and 54 ODIs for the Pakistani national cricket team from 1973 to 1985. His younger brother, Rameez Raja, also represented Pakistan in Tests and ODIs, becoming captain of the national side. Another brother, Zaeem Raja, also played first-class cricket, as did his father, Raja Saleem Akhtar.

Early and personal life

Raja was born in Multan in the Punjab. His father was a high-ranking civil servant. Raja obtained a master’s degree in political science from Government College, Lahore. He was captain of the Pakistan Under-19 side. He settled in London after marrying an Englishwoman, Ann. He studied for a certificate in education from Durham University, and had a spell teaching geography, mathematics and physical education at Caterham School in Surrey. He was also a coach for the Pakistan Under-19 team, and International Cricket Council match referee in 15 Tests and 34 ODIs from 2002 to 2004. He died of a heart attack in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, England in August 2006 while playing cricket for the Surrey over-50s side. He is survived by his wife and his sons, Ali and Ahmad.

Career

During his playing career, Raja was known primarily as a dashing middle-order left-handed batsman, with a characteristically generous backlift and breathtaking stokeplay combining a keen eye with wristy execution. Raja also bowled flat wrist spin with his right hand that was good enough to take 51 wickets in Tests, with his scalps including Clive Lloyd, Roy Fredericks, Glenn Turner and Viv Richards. In all, he played in 250 first-class matches, scoring 11,434 runs at an average of 35.18, including 17 centuries, and taking 558 wickets at an average of 29.05.
His finest hour in Test cricket was the tour to the West Indies in 1976–77, when he topped the Pakistani batting averages with 517 runs at 57.4 and came second in the bowling averages with 7 wickets at 18.7, behind Majid Khan. He also scored 14 sixes in the Test series, setting a record that has been equalled 4 times but still remains the only instance away from home.[2] He top-scored in both innings of the drawn 1st Test in Barbados, to push West Indies to within one wicket of their first loss at Kensington Oval since 1935. In their second innings, Pakistan were reduced to 158–9 by Andy Roberts and Colin Croft, a lead of only 144 just over half-way through the fourth day, but a last-wicket stand of 133 with Wasim Bari set the West Indies a target of 306. At the close of the fifth day, West Indies were 55 runs adrift, on 251–9. West Indies won their next 12 matches at Bridgetown, until they were finally beaten by England in the 4th Test in 1994. He was a cricket teacher at Haslemere Preparatory School from 2004 to 2006.. There is a memorial plaque there in his honour. He is also remembered in the north east of England, playing for Durham CCC, before the county was awarded 1st class status.
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Basit Ali

Basit Ali   (born December 13, 1970, Karachi, Sindh) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 19 Tests and 50 ODIs from 1993 to 1996. He was recognized by many to have a similar batting style as Javed Miandad. A right-hander, he has the relatively uncommon statistic of having a higher ODI than Test batting average. Strong through the covers and point, Ali was also a nerveless hooker and puller against the fast bowlers. Ali was a successful junior cricketer, at one time holding the record for most hundreds in a Karchi zonal league season [2]. He debuted for Pakistan aged 22 in March 1993, playing both ODI and Test cricket in a tour of the Caribbean. For similarities and batting styles and temperament, he was initially seen as the one who’d take the mantle of Pakistani batting from Javed Miandad. He went on to play in 19 Tests but made just the one Test century, against New Zealand in 1993-94.
 
An aggressive risk taker, he was a regular in the Pakistani ODI side for a while in the mid 90’s. In November 1993 he scored the then second fastest One Day International century in history, with a 67 ball effort against the West Indies at Sharjah. He took 5 more balls as compared to the record of Mohammad Azharuddin who took 62 balls. Basit Ali finished on 127 not out. Aamir sohail was acting captain in that match.http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/2001/08/03/stories/07030288.htm].He became involved in the Pakistani match fixing scandal which ended the career of Saleem Malik. Ali and Rashid Latif accused Pakistani players of match-fixing as well as facing allegations against themselves [3]. He was forced into a premature retirement.
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Saleem Yousuf

Saleem Yousuf (born December 7, 1959) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 32 Tests and 86 ODIs from 1982 to 1990. He was a wicket keeper. He made his highest Test score of 91 not out against England at Edgbaston in 1987. One of his most memorable innings was in a match against the West Indies in the 1987 World Cup, which turned certain defeat into victory for Pakistan.
Post-retirement

After retirement, he served on the Selection Committee for the Pakistan Cricket Board. Nowadays he is serving as Principal Appraiser in Pakistan Customs Service.

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Rameez Raja

Rameez Hasan Raja  born 14 August 1962 is a former Pakistani right handed batsman in cricket, who represented the Pakistan cricket team during the 1980s and 1990s. He also been captain of the national team. Since retiring from professional cricket, he has become a sports and television commentator. Raja was born in Punjabi family in faisalabad, Pakistan and studied at Saint Anthony’s High School Lahore and Aitchison College, Lahore and holds a Masters Degree in Business Administrationfrom IIM Ahemdabad (India). His brother, Wasim Raja, also played Test cricket for Pakistan and another brother, Zaeem Raja, played First-class cricket in Pakistan. He completed his masters degree at Oxford University.

Career

Raja made his First class cricket debut in 1978. He received his opportunity to play in a Test match against England. His performance was unimpressive, as he was dismissed for 1 run in each innings. However, with the retirement of several players in the Pakistan squad and with the help of his years of experience in first class cricket, Raja was able to secure a spot in the national side. Raja played international cricket for 13 years, appearing in 57 Test matches, with a career average of 31.83 and scoring two centuries. In the One Day International arena, he played 200 matches and scored 9 centuries. He was a member of the national side that reached the semi finals of the 1987 World Cup. He scored 2 centuries in the 1992 World Cup, which was held in Australia, including a century, against New Zealand, who had been un defeated during that period. Raja was awarded the man of the match for his match winning performance which earned Pakistan a place in the semi-finals of the tournament. In the final against England, Raja had the honour of taking the final catch which won the world cup for Pakistan. This became the pinnacle of his cricketing career, as within a year of this triumph, he had lost form and was dropped from the national side.
 
However, he was recalled back to the Pakistan squad and played in the 1996 cricket World Cup. During the 1995–1996 season, he was removed from the captaincy, after Pakistan lost their first home series to Sri Lanka. His final game in a Test match for Pakistan, was as captain in the 1996–1997 tour of Sri Lanka, however the team failed to win a match during the series. He retired from all forms of cricket in 1997 and since then he has been active as a television commentator and as an administrator for both Pakistan and International cricket. Raja has worked as a commentator on Test Match Special and Sky Sports, during the 2006 England Test series against Pakistan. He has also worked as the chief executive of the Pakistan Cricket Board, but resigned from his job in August 2004, citing increasing media commitments.

1987–1988: Given out for obstructing the field

Raja became the first player in One Day International history to be given out by “obstructing the field” against England, in a match at Karachi in 1987. England had scored 263 runs for 6 wickets during their 44 over innings. For Pakistan, Raja opened the batting and had reached 98 runs when the last ball of the match was bowled, with Pakistan needing 25 runs to win in the last over. During this last over, he hit the ball and sprinted for two runs that would have given him his century, but was well short of the crease when the fielder’s return came towards him and Raja knocked the ball away with his bat and was given out “obstructing the field”.

1995–1996: Captain of Pakistan Cricket team

Almost a decade later, he was involved in another controversy when he captained Pakistan to their first Test home series loss against Sri Lanka in September 1995. Before being brought in as captain for the series, he had often opened the batting innings with both Aamer Sohail and Saeed Anwar at different match, but without success. As a captain, he did not open the innings in any of the three Test match and opted to bat at number three, his preferred position. He was sacked as captain after Pakistan lost the series and was replaced by Wasim Akram. He got a second chance at captaincy when, immediately in the next season in 1996–1997, he led the Pakistan team for the second time in two Test match against Sri Lanka in Sri Lanka, but failed to achieved a win. This was his final appearance in a Test match for Pakistan.

2003–2004: Pakistan Cricket Board

Raja worked as a CEO of the Pakistan Cricket Board, simultaneously serving as a cricket commentator. He resigned from the post of the CEO in August 2004 citing increasing media commitments as the reason for his decision.
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