Junaid Khan

Muhammad Junaid Khan, widely known as Junaid Khan (Pashto/Urdu: جنید خان‎; born 24 December 1989, Swabi District) is a Pakistani international cricketer who bowls left arm fast. He is the first player from Swabi to qualify for the Pakistan national cricket team,[1] and his cousin,[2] the leg-spinner Yasir Shah, followed his path later on. After an injury to Sohail Tanvir on the eve of the 2011 World Cup, Khan was called up as his replacement, with no experience in international cricket. Khan did not play in the tournament, and later made his ODI debut in April 2011. In June that year Khan represented Lancashire County Cricket Club in English domestic cricket.

Sighting

No cricket had came from Swabi before and Junaid Khan didn’t take interest in cricket initially, he played with tape-ball & was introduced to Hard ball setup by his cousin. At 16 years age Junaid Khan was measured as the fastest bowler in the NWFP Twenty/20 competition.[3] Junaid Khan said, “Some of my team mates suggested that I should go for the Under 17 trials Abbottabad. I was in two minds but afterwards I was relieved that I attended the trials, as Ehteshamuddin spotted me and told me that I had potential and that I should go to Lahore”.[4]

Early domestic career

Khan made his first-class debut on 24 January 2007 at the age of 17. Playing for Abbottabad against Multan, his first wicket was that of Majid Majeed. The match ended in a draw and Khan finished with four wickets for 57 runs (4/57).[5] For four years he took wickets consistently for his domestic team Abottabad and he was the team’s chief strike bowler, he also played for Abbottabad Falcons in the Faysal Bank Twenty20. In the 2008/09 season, Khan represented the Khan Research Laboratories cricket team and played for them in the final of the 2008/09 Quaid-i-Azam Trophy; he took a single wicket in the match as his team lost to Sialkot.[6] Khan also played for Pakistan A. In the unofficial Test series between Pakistan A and Sri Lanka A in 2010, Junaid was his team’s leading wicket-taker with ten from two matches.[7] e
He became very popular during the India-Pakistan series 2013 as he was the highest wicket taker of the series.

Selection into the Pakistan team

Following the recurrence of a knee injury to Sohail Tanvir, the uncapped Khan was added in Pakistan’s squad for the 2011 World Cup.[8] He did not play a single match in the tournament and was forced to wait for his ODI debut. When Pakistan toured the West Indies for two Tests, five ODIs, and a T20I in April and May Khan was included in the squad. On 21 April Khan made his T20I debut and went wicketless in the match.[9] Two days later, Khan, Mohammad Salman, and Hammad Azam made their ODI debuts against West Indies. Opening the bowling with Wahab Riaz, Khan conceded 49 runs from 10 overs without taking a wicket.[10] Pakistan won the series 3–2 and Khan finished with three wickets from five matches, making him the team’s fourth highest wicket-taker.[11] His first ODI wicket was that of Marlon Samuels.
In May, Pakistan toured Ireland for a two-match ODI series. Junaid was Man of the Match in the first fixture, taking four wickets for twelve runs to help Pakistan to a seven-wicket victory.[12] Pakistan won the series 2–0 and Junaid finished as the second-highest wicket-taker for the series with six at an average of 10.83.[13][14] On the advice of former Pakistan and Lancashire all-rounder Wasim Akram, Lancashire signed Junaid Khan on “modest terms” according to coach Mike Watkinson to play for them in the Friends Life t20 in June with the possibility of playing in the County Championship.[15][16] Problems with his visa meant Khan’s Lancashire debut was delayed and it was not until 27 June that he represented Lancashire for the first time in a twenty20 match.[17] Later that month Khan made his County Championship debut against Durham, stepping in for the injured Farveez Maharoof, Lancashire’s other overseas player.[18] While playing for Lancashire he took career best t20 bowling figures of 3/12 against the Derbyshire Falcons.[19] During his spell with the club, Khan received advice from Akram on how to bowl in English conditions.[20]
In August, Khan was awarded a category C central contract with the Pakistan Cricket Board; six players were in category A, eight in B, and nine (including Khan) in C.[21] When Pakistan toured Zimbabwe in September for a Test three ODIs and two T20Is, the national selectors took the opportunity to give inexperienced players an opportunity. Frontline bowlers Wahab Riaz and Umar Gul were rested and Khan was chosen as part of the squad.[22][23] Although Khan had helped Lancashire reach t20 finals days, international selection meant that Khan would be unavailable to take part and would miss the end of the season with the club.[24] On 1 September Khan made his Test debut against Zimbabwe; Pakistan’s fast bowlers in the match were inexperienced, with just one Test cap between them. The coach, Waqar Younis, commented that though Khan had a successful spell with Lancashire he still had a lot to learn as a Test bowler.[25] Khan’s sole wicket in the match, which Pakistan won, was that of batsman Craig Ervine caught and bowled.[26]
The following month, Pakistan played Sri Lanka in three Test, five ODIs, and a T20I. On the opening day of the Test series, on a pitch suited to batting, Khan took his maiden five-wicket haul in Tests.[27] Pakistan won the Test series 1–0, and Khan contributed 12 wickets to the victory. During the fifth ODI he suffered the first injury of his career: a partial tear of the muscles in his abdomen. As a result, he was unable to play for six weeks and missed Pakistan’s tour of Bangladesh in November and December.[28] His match winning performance also came during a T20 match against England. Junaid Khan got selected for the ODI squad for Australia’s tour of Pakistan in UAE, August–September 2012,[29] playing his first series against Australia. However he was excluded from the T20 side, hence being excluded from the T20 World Cup being held in Sri Lanka in September. This decision was criticised to be unjustified due to the selection of fast bowler Mohammad Sami and his recent performance against Sri Lanka.
In December 2012, Junaid Khan was again picked for the series against India and was given a chance in the ODI series and he performed superbly by picking up 4 wickets in the first match (clean bowled Sehwag, Kohli, Yuvraj) and helped in Pakistan win in first ODI and again performed superbly in the second ODI and picked up three wickets including two top order vital wickets of Gambhir and Kohli. So he has gained a place in Pakistan eleven and is considered to be one of the leading left arm fast bowlers of Pakistan who can bowl with pace, has the ability to bowl yorker and swings the bowl both ways. In November 2013, he successfully defend 9 runs in the final over in Port Elizabeth clinching Pakistan a 1 run win and Pakistan’s first bilateral ODI series win against the Proteas.
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Mohsin Hasan Khan

Mohsin Hasan Khan   born 15 March 1955, Karachi, Sindh) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 48 Tests and 75 ODIs from 1977 to 1986 mainly as an opening batsman.

Life and career

Playing in this role for Pakistan against India at Lahore in 1982–83, he scored 101 not out of Pakistan’s second-innings total of 135/1. This is the lowest team score in Test cricket to have included a century.[1]Mohsin was one of a minority of South Asian players to come to terms with conditions in Australia and England, scoring two consecutive centuries in Australia in 1983/4[2] and becoming the first Pakistani batsman to score a Test double century at Lord’s, which he did earlier in 1982.[3] He retired from international cricket to pursue a film career.
Mohsin later married Bollywood movie star Reena Roy and had a short career as an actor in the Indian film industry. He has since divorced Roy and remarried and lives in Karachi, Pakistan. He has a daughter with Reena Roy, who now lives with her mother in India. He had named his daughter Jannat, but she is now called Sanam. On 2 March 2010 Mohsin Khan was named Iqbal Qasim‘s successor as chief selector of the Pakistan national cricket team. He accepted the role turned down by fellow one-time opener Saeed Anwar. Mohsin is Pakistan’s fourth chief of selectors in the 12 months of 2009–10.[4]

Filmography

  • 1997 Mahaanta
  • 1996 Ghunghat
  • 1994 Beta
  • 1994 Madam X
  • 1993 The Elephant Walk
  • 1993 Jannat
  • 1992 Laat Saab
  • 1991 Saathi
  • 1991 Pratikar
  • 1991 Gunehgar Kaun
  • 1991 Fateh
  • 1989 Batwara
  • 1992 tyagi
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Wasim Hasan Raja

Wasim Hasan Raja  July 1952 – 23 August 2006), was a Pakistani cricketer who played in 57 Tests and 54 ODIs for the Pakistani national cricket team from 1973 to 1985. His younger brother, Rameez Raja, also represented Pakistan in Tests and ODIs, becoming captain of the national side. Another brother, Zaeem Raja, also played first-class cricket, as did his father, Raja Saleem Akhtar.

Early and personal life

Raja was born in Multan in the Punjab. His father was a high-ranking civil servant. Raja obtained a master’s degree in political science from Government College, Lahore. He was captain of the Pakistan Under-19 side. He settled in London after marrying an Englishwoman, Ann. He studied for a certificate in education from Durham University, and had a spell teaching geography, mathematics and physical education at Caterham School in Surrey. He was also a coach for the Pakistan Under-19 team, and International Cricket Council match referee in 15 Tests and 34 ODIs from 2002 to 2004. He died of a heart attack in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, England in August 2006 while playing cricket for the Surrey over-50s side. He is survived by his wife and his sons, Ali and Ahmad.

Career

During his playing career, Raja was known primarily as a dashing middle-order left-handed batsman, with a characteristically generous backlift and breathtaking stokeplay combining a keen eye with wristy execution. Raja also bowled flat wrist spin with his right hand that was good enough to take 51 wickets in Tests, with his scalps including Clive Lloyd, Roy Fredericks, Glenn Turner and Viv Richards. In all, he played in 250 first-class matches, scoring 11,434 runs at an average of 35.18, including 17 centuries, and taking 558 wickets at an average of 29.05.
His finest hour in Test cricket was the tour to the West Indies in 1976–77, when he topped the Pakistani batting averages with 517 runs at 57.4 and came second in the bowling averages with 7 wickets at 18.7, behind Majid Khan. He also scored 14 sixes in the Test series, setting a record that has been equalled 4 times but still remains the only instance away from home.[2] He top-scored in both innings of the drawn 1st Test in Barbados, to push West Indies to within one wicket of their first loss at Kensington Oval since 1935. In their second innings, Pakistan were reduced to 158–9 by Andy Roberts and Colin Croft, a lead of only 144 just over half-way through the fourth day, but a last-wicket stand of 133 with Wasim Bari set the West Indies a target of 306. At the close of the fifth day, West Indies were 55 runs adrift, on 251–9. West Indies won their next 12 matches at Bridgetown, until they were finally beaten by England in the 4th Test in 1994. He was a cricket teacher at Haslemere Preparatory School from 2004 to 2006.. There is a memorial plaque there in his honour. He is also remembered in the north east of England, playing for Durham CCC, before the county was awarded 1st class status.
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Basit Ali

Basit Ali   (born December 13, 1970, Karachi, Sindh) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 19 Tests and 50 ODIs from 1993 to 1996. He was recognized by many to have a similar batting style as Javed Miandad. A right-hander, he has the relatively uncommon statistic of having a higher ODI than Test batting average. Strong through the covers and point, Ali was also a nerveless hooker and puller against the fast bowlers. Ali was a successful junior cricketer, at one time holding the record for most hundreds in a Karchi zonal league season [2]. He debuted for Pakistan aged 22 in March 1993, playing both ODI and Test cricket in a tour of the Caribbean. For similarities and batting styles and temperament, he was initially seen as the one who’d take the mantle of Pakistani batting from Javed Miandad. He went on to play in 19 Tests but made just the one Test century, against New Zealand in 1993-94.
 
An aggressive risk taker, he was a regular in the Pakistani ODI side for a while in the mid 90’s. In November 1993 he scored the then second fastest One Day International century in history, with a 67 ball effort against the West Indies at Sharjah. He took 5 more balls as compared to the record of Mohammad Azharuddin who took 62 balls. Basit Ali finished on 127 not out. Aamir sohail was acting captain in that match.http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/2001/08/03/stories/07030288.htm].He became involved in the Pakistani match fixing scandal which ended the career of Saleem Malik. Ali and Rashid Latif accused Pakistani players of match-fixing as well as facing allegations against themselves [3]. He was forced into a premature retirement.
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Saleem Yousuf

Saleem Yousuf (born December 7, 1959) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 32 Tests and 86 ODIs from 1982 to 1990. He was a wicket keeper. He made his highest Test score of 91 not out against England at Edgbaston in 1987. One of his most memorable innings was in a match against the West Indies in the 1987 World Cup, which turned certain defeat into victory for Pakistan.
Post-retirement

After retirement, he served on the Selection Committee for the Pakistan Cricket Board. Nowadays he is serving as Principal Appraiser in Pakistan Customs Service.

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Rameez Raja

Rameez Hasan Raja  born 14 August 1962 is a former Pakistani right handed batsman in cricket, who represented the Pakistan cricket team during the 1980s and 1990s. He also been captain of the national team. Since retiring from professional cricket, he has become a sports and television commentator. Raja was born in Punjabi family in faisalabad, Pakistan and studied at Saint Anthony’s High School Lahore and Aitchison College, Lahore and holds a Masters Degree in Business Administrationfrom IIM Ahemdabad (India). His brother, Wasim Raja, also played Test cricket for Pakistan and another brother, Zaeem Raja, played First-class cricket in Pakistan. He completed his masters degree at Oxford University.

Career

Raja made his First class cricket debut in 1978. He received his opportunity to play in a Test match against England. His performance was unimpressive, as he was dismissed for 1 run in each innings. However, with the retirement of several players in the Pakistan squad and with the help of his years of experience in first class cricket, Raja was able to secure a spot in the national side. Raja played international cricket for 13 years, appearing in 57 Test matches, with a career average of 31.83 and scoring two centuries. In the One Day International arena, he played 200 matches and scored 9 centuries. He was a member of the national side that reached the semi finals of the 1987 World Cup. He scored 2 centuries in the 1992 World Cup, which was held in Australia, including a century, against New Zealand, who had been un defeated during that period. Raja was awarded the man of the match for his match winning performance which earned Pakistan a place in the semi-finals of the tournament. In the final against England, Raja had the honour of taking the final catch which won the world cup for Pakistan. This became the pinnacle of his cricketing career, as within a year of this triumph, he had lost form and was dropped from the national side.
 
However, he was recalled back to the Pakistan squad and played in the 1996 cricket World Cup. During the 1995–1996 season, he was removed from the captaincy, after Pakistan lost their first home series to Sri Lanka. His final game in a Test match for Pakistan, was as captain in the 1996–1997 tour of Sri Lanka, however the team failed to win a match during the series. He retired from all forms of cricket in 1997 and since then he has been active as a television commentator and as an administrator for both Pakistan and International cricket. Raja has worked as a commentator on Test Match Special and Sky Sports, during the 2006 England Test series against Pakistan. He has also worked as the chief executive of the Pakistan Cricket Board, but resigned from his job in August 2004, citing increasing media commitments.

1987–1988: Given out for obstructing the field

Raja became the first player in One Day International history to be given out by “obstructing the field” against England, in a match at Karachi in 1987. England had scored 263 runs for 6 wickets during their 44 over innings. For Pakistan, Raja opened the batting and had reached 98 runs when the last ball of the match was bowled, with Pakistan needing 25 runs to win in the last over. During this last over, he hit the ball and sprinted for two runs that would have given him his century, but was well short of the crease when the fielder’s return came towards him and Raja knocked the ball away with his bat and was given out “obstructing the field”.

1995–1996: Captain of Pakistan Cricket team

Almost a decade later, he was involved in another controversy when he captained Pakistan to their first Test home series loss against Sri Lanka in September 1995. Before being brought in as captain for the series, he had often opened the batting innings with both Aamer Sohail and Saeed Anwar at different match, but without success. As a captain, he did not open the innings in any of the three Test match and opted to bat at number three, his preferred position. He was sacked as captain after Pakistan lost the series and was replaced by Wasim Akram. He got a second chance at captaincy when, immediately in the next season in 1996–1997, he led the Pakistan team for the second time in two Test match against Sri Lanka in Sri Lanka, but failed to achieved a win. This was his final appearance in a Test match for Pakistan.

2003–2004: Pakistan Cricket Board

Raja worked as a CEO of the Pakistan Cricket Board, simultaneously serving as a cricket commentator. He resigned from the post of the CEO in August 2004 citing increasing media commitments as the reason for his decision.
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Wasim Bari

Wasim Bari   (born 23 March 1948, Karachi, Sindh) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 81 Tests and 51 ODIs from 1967 to 1984. Bari was a wicket-keeper and right-handed batsman. At the end of his 17-year career he was the most capped player in Pakistani Test history. His talent was first recognised in 1967 with members of the England under 25 team stating that he was the best keeper to come out of the South Asia. It was in England where he made his Test debut, with Colin Milburn being his first dismissal. With the bat he only managed 15.88 per innings in his career but played some famous innings for Pakistan. There were none more famous than his unbeaten 60 from number 11, in which he made a last wicket partnership of 133 with Wasim Raja. According to Tony Greig, commentator and former England captain, most people believe Alan Knott was the best wicket-keeper to have played the game in that era but Knott himself believed Bari was better than him.

Keeping records

In 1971 at Leeds, he equalled the then world record of 8 catches in a Test match. He was in the record books again in 1976/77 by stumpings 4 batsmen in a Test, against the Australians. In 1979 against New Zealand he caught 7 of the first 8 batsmen, creating a world record for most dismissals in a Test innings. He finished his Test career with 228 Test victims, the most by a Pakistani and to this day the most by a South Asian keeper.
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Shahid Afridi

Shahid Afridi ( born Sahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi  born on 1 March 1980)[2] is a Pakistani cricketer. Between 1996 and 2012, Afridi played 27 Tests, 350 One Day Internationals, and 59 Twenty20 Internationals (T20Is) for the Pakistani national team. He made his ODI debut on 2 October 1996 against Kenya and his Test debut on 22 October 1998 against Australia. He is known for his aggressive batting style,[3] and holds the record for the fastest ODI century which he made in his first international innings, as well as scoring 32 runs in a single over, the second highest scoring over ever in an ODI.[4] He also holds the distinction of having hit the most number of sixes in the history of ODI cricket.[5]
 
Afridi considers himself a better bowler than batsman, and has taken 48 Test wickets and over 350 in ODIs. Currently Afridi is third on the list of leading wicket takers in the Twenty20 format, behind Saeed Ajmal and Umer Gul of Pakistan, taking 62 wickets from 56 matches.[6] Shahid Afridi has signed to play for Sydney Thunder in Australia’s Twenty20 Big Bash league.[7] In June 2009, Afridi took over the Twenty20 captaincy from Younus Khan, and was later appointed ODI captain for the 2010 Asia Cup. In his first match as ODI captain against Sri Lanka he scored a century however Pakistan still lost by 16 runs. He then also took over the Test captaincy but resigned after one match in charge citing lack of form and ability to play Test cricket; at the same time he announced his retirement from Tests. He retained the captaincy in limited-overs form of the game and led the team in the 2011 World Cup. In May 2011, having led Pakistan in 34 ODIs, Afridi was replaced as captain. Later that month he announced his conditional retirement from international cricket in protest against his treatment by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). However, in October he reversed his decision. UNICEF and Pakistani authorities have taken Shahid Afridi on board for its anti-polio campaign in the tribal belt of lawless Waziristan region

International career

In October 1996 at the age of sixteen Afridi was drafted into the ODI team during the four-nation Sameer Cup 1996–97 as a leg spinner as a replacement for the injured Mushtaq Ahmed.[10] He made his debut on 2 October against Kenya, however he didn’t bat and went wicketless.[11] In the next match against Sri Lanka, Afridi batted at number three in the role of a pinch-hitter. In his first international innings, Afridi broke the record for fastest century in ODI cricket, reaching his hundred from 37 balls. The eleven sixes he struck also equalled the record for most in an ODI innings.[12][nb 1] Aged 16 years and 217 days, Afridi became the youngest player to score an ODI century.[14] Pakistan posted a total of 371, at the time the second-highest in ODIs, and won by 82 runs; Afridi was named man of the match.[12]
 
Two years after appearing on the international scene, Afridi made his Test debut in the third game of a three-match series against Australia on 22 October 1998.[15] By this point he had already played 66 ODIs, at the time a record before playing Tests.[16] He opened the batting, making scores of 10 and 6, and took five wickets in the first innings.[15] He played his second Test the following January during Pakistan’s tour of India; it was the first Test between the two countries since 1990.[17] Again opening the batting, Afridi scored his maiden Test century, scoring 141 runs from 191 balls. In the same match he also claimed three wickets for 54 runs.[18] After winning the first match by 12 runs, Pakistan lost the second to draw the series.[19]
 
In 2001, Afridi signed a contract to represent Leicestershire. In five first-class matches he scored 295 runs at an average of 42.14, including a highest score of 164,[20] and took 11 wickets at an average of 46.45;[21] Afridi also played 11 one day matches for the club, scoring 481 runs at an average of 40.08[22] and taking 18 wickets at 24.04.[23] His highest score of 95 came from 58 balls in a semi-final of the C&G Trophy to help Leicestershire beat Lancashire by seven wickets.[24] Derbyshire County Cricket Club signed Afridi to play for them in the first two months of the 2003 English cricket season.[25] In June 2004 Afridi signed with English county side Kent to play for them in three Twenty20 matches and one Totesport League match.[26]
 
Afridi made his presence felt in the third Test against India in March 2005, scoring a quick-fire second-innings half-century and taking five wickets in the match (including Tendulkar twice) to help Pakistan to win the game and register a series draw.[27] In April Afridi struck what at the time was the equal second-fastest century in ODIs; he reached 100 off 45 deliveries against India, sharing the record with West Indian Brian Lara.[28] Afridi was more consistent with his batting and bowling throughout 2005, starting with the tours of India and West Indies and through to the England tour. The Pakistani coach Bob Woolmer helped Afridi to reach a fuller potential by improving his shot selection and giving him free rein over his batting attitude..[8]
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Wasim Akram

Wasim Akram   born 3 June 1966) is a former Pakistani cricketer. He was a genuine left arm fast bowler who could bowl with significant pace and left-handed batsman who represented the Pakistan national cricket team in Test cricket and One Day International (ODI) matches.In October 2013,Wasim Akram was the only Pakistani cricketer to be named in an all-time Test World XI to mark the 150th anniversary of Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack.[1][2][3][4]Akram is regarded as one of the greatest fast bowlers in the history of cricket. He holds the world record for most wickets in List A cricket with 881 and is second only to Sri Lankan off-spin bowler, Muttiah Muralitharan in terms of ODI wickets with 502. He is considered to be one of the founders and perhaps the finest exponent of reverse swing bowling.
Akram had a very special talent to move the ball both ways in one delivery which is called “double swing of Wasim Akram”. No one in cricket history has done it so far.[5]6][7]He was the first bowler to reach the 500-wicket mark in ODI cricket during the 2003 World Cup. In 2002 Wisden released its only list of best players of all time. Wasim was ranked as the best bowler in ODI of all time with a rating of 1223.5, ahead of Allan Donald, Imran Khan, Waqar Younis, Joel Garner, Glen McGrath and Muralitharan.[8] Wasim has taken 23 4-wicket hauls in ODI in 356 matches he played.[5] On 30 September 2009, Akram was one of five new members inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.[9][10] He is the bowling coach of Kolkata Knight Riders.[11] but took a break from the position for IPL 6 citing a need to spend more time with family

Early and personal life

Wasim Akram was born in Lahore in a Punjabi family on 3 June 1966.[13] He was educated at Government Islamia College Civil Lines Lahore, where he played as an opening bowler and batsman.[14] Like several other Pakistani cricketers during the 1980s, his inclusion into the national side was at the behest of a senior player in the team, which in Akram’s case, was Javed Miandad.[15]At the age of 30, Akram was diagnosed with diabetes. “I remember what a shock it was because I was a healthy sportsman with no history of diabetes in my family, so I didn’t expect it at all. It seemed strange that it happened to me when I was 30, but it was a very stressful time and doctors said that can trigger it.”[16] Since then he has actively sought to be involved in various awareness campaigns for diabetes.[17]
Akram married Huma in 1995.[18] They had two sons Tahmoor (born 1996) and Akbar (born 2000)[19] from their marriage of fifteen years. Huma died of multiple organ failure at Apollo Hospital in Chennai, India on 25 October 2009.[20]On 7 July 2013, it was reported that Akram had become engaged to Melbourne woman Shaniera Thompson, whom he had met while on a visit to Melbourne in 2011.[21] Wasim Akram married his Australian girlfriend, Shaniera Thompson on August 12, 2013, saying he has started a new life on a happy note.”I married Shaniera in Lahore last week in a simple ceremony and this is the start of a new life for me, my wife and for my kids”.[22]

International career

First-class cricket

In 1988 Akram signed for Lancashire County Cricket Club in England. From 1988 to 1998, he opened their bowling attack in their ECB Trophy, Benson and Hedges Cup and National League tournaments. He was a favourite of the local British fans who used to sing a song called “Wasim for England” at Lancashire’s matches. In 1998, with Akram as captain, Lancashire won the ECB Trophy and Axa League and finished second in the championship tournament despite losing only five matches in all competitions throughout the season.[23]

Test cricket

Akram made his Test cricket debut for Pakistan against New Zealand in 1985[24] and in his second Test match, he claimed 10 wickets.[25] A few weeks prior to his selection into the Pakistan team, he was an unknown club cricketer who had failed to make it even to his college team. He came to the trials at Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore in Pakistan, but for the first two days he did not get a chance to bowl. On the third day he got a chance; his performance convincing Javed Miandad to insist upon his inclusion in the national team.[15] Akram was hence given an opportunity to play for Pakistan, without any significant domestic experience. Akram’s rise in international cricket was rapid during the late 1980s. When Pakistan toured the West Indies in 1988, he looked to be the fastest bowler between the two sides. However, a groin injury impeded his career in the late 1980s. Following two surgeries, he re-emerged in the 1990s as a fast bowler who focused more on swing and accurate bowling.[26]

One Day International

Akram started his ODI career against New Zealand in Pakistan in 1984 under the captaincy of Zaheer Abbass.[27] He rose to prominence taking five wickets in his 3rd ODI against Australia in the 1985 Benson & Hedges World Championship. His wickets included those of Kepler Wessels, Dean Jones and captain Allan Border.[28]

1983–91

In the 1984–85 Rothmans Four-Nations Cup and the 1985–86 Rothmans Sharjah Cup he took five wickets with a run rate of under 3.50. The 1985–1986 Austral-Asia Cup involved Australia, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and was played in UAE Sharjah. Akram, with the help of Abdul Qadir, bowled out New Zealand’s batting line up for 64 in the second semi final of cup. Pakistan won that game with more than 27 overs to spare obtaining one of the biggest wins in Pakistani history. In the final against India he and Imran shared five wickets. Akram’s wickets included Dilip Vengsarkar and Ravi Shastri. In the 1987 Reliance World Cup held for the 1st time in the sub-continent, Akram struggled on Pakistani pitches where he managed only 7 wickets with an average of over 40 in 7 matches. Akram played West Indies, Sri Lanka and England twice. All group matches were played in Pakistan.
In the 1988–89 Benson and Hedges World Series he managed figures of 4–25 against Australia.[29] He took his hundredth wicket at Sharjah in 1989–1990 Champions Trophy – 2nd Match against West Indies. His 100th wicket was of Ambrose. In that match he took a five-wickets haul for the second time in his career.[30] In the same match he took his first hat-trick against West Indies. All three batsman were bowled.[30][31][32] On 4 May 1990 in Sharjah, Akram took his second ODI hat-trick against |Australia. All three batsmen were bowled this time also.[31][33]His best years in late 1980s were from 1986–1989 when which he took 100 wickets at 22.71 apiece and economy rate of less than 3.9 run/over with four 4-wicket hauls. His first two hauls against Sri Lanka and Bangladesh came in Sri Lanka in 1986.[34]Up to December 1991 Akram took 143 wickets in 107 matches with an average of almost 24 and economy rate of 3.84.[26]

1992–97

Akram was a significant figure in the 1992 Cricket World Cup held in Australia, when Pakistan won the tournament. In the final against England, his batting performance during his innings of 33 runs off 18 balls, pushed Pakistan to a score of 249 runs for 6 wickets. Akram then took the wicket of Ian Botham early on the English batting innings and when brought back into the bowling attack later on, with the ball reverse swinging, he produced a spell of bowling which led to Allan Lamb and Chris Lewis being bowled in successive deliveries in one over. His performances earned him the Man of the Match award for the final.[35][36] In 1993 Akram took 2 consecutive 4-wicket hauls against Sri Lanka in Sharjah in which 7 out of 8 wickets were either LBW or bowled.[37]
In the 1992–1993 Total International Series in South Africa (involving Pakistan, West Indies and South Africa) he took 5 wickets against South Africa and got his 200th wicket in his 143rd match.[38][39][40] Akram took 46 wickets in calendar year 1993, his best year ever in ODI. His average which was less than 19 with an economy rate of less than 3.8 runs per over. He took six 4-wicket hauls in 1993, the most by him in any year.[40] In the 1996 World Cup he missed the quarter final match against India which Pakistan lost and went out of the World Cup. Wasim’s great career was often tainted by controversy, not least in the Caribbean in April 1993, his maiden tour as Pakistan’s captain. During the team’s stop-over in Grenada, he was arrested along with three team-mates – Waqar Younis, Aqib Javed and Mushtaq Ahmed – and two female British tourists, and charged with possession of marijuana.[41] Between 1994 and 1996 he took 84 wickets in 39 matches.[40]From January 1992 to December 1997 Akram played 131 matches took 198 wickets at an average of 21.86 with 14 4-wicket hauls in ODIs.[26]

1998 to the 2003 World Cup

In 1999, he led Pakistan to the brink of victory in the World Cup before they capitulated and was defeated by Australia in the final, by eight wickets with almost 30 overs to spare.[42] This was the start of the match fixing controversies, as critics believed Akram had set up the match for Australia. However, none of the allegations could be proved.[43][44]He was Pakistan’s best bowler in the 2003 Cricket World Cup taking 12 wickets in 6 matches.[45] However, Pakistan failed to reach the super six of the tournament and Akram was one of the eight players to be sacked by the Pakistan Cricket Board as a result.[46][47]

Records

Akram won 17 Man-of-the-Match awards in 104 tests. He took 4 hat-tricks in International cricket – two in ODIs.[30][33] and two in Tests,[48][49] He finished with 22 Man-of-the-Match awards in ODIs. In 199 ODI match wins, he took 326 wickets at under 19 apiece with a run rate of 3.70 and took 18 four-wicket hauls.[26] His 257 not-out against Zimbabwe in 1996 is the highest innings by a number 8 batsman in tests. He hit 12 sixes in that, most by anyone in a test innings.[50]Prior to his retirement, he was one of eight senior players dropped for the Sharjah Cup in April 2003, and was then omitted from the Pakistan squad for the subsequent Bank Alfalah Cup triangular series.[51] Due to his omission from the team, he did not participate in a farewell match. Akram fulfilled his contract play for Hampshire until the end of the English season.[52]

Post retirement

Media career

Since retiring from cricket, Akram has worked and taken up commentary for television networks and can currently be seen as a sports commentator for ESPN Star Sports and ARY Digital among others. He did commentary on a variety of sporting tournaments including the 2009 Women’s Cricket World Cup in Australia, the 2009 ICC World Twenty20 in England, the 2009 ICC Champions Trophy in South Africa, and the 2011 ICC World Cup in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh..[12]
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Yusuf Pathan

Yusuf Pathan  (born 17 November 1982) is an Indian cricketer. Pathan made his debut in first-class cricket in 2001/02. He is a powerful and aggressive right-handed batsman and a right-arm offbreak bowler. His half-brother Irfan Pathan is also an Indian cricketer. He is also the first batsman to be given out for obstructing the field in Twenty20 cricket

Personal life

Yusuf married Mumbai based physiotherapist Afreen on 27 March 2013.

Career

Following his impressive performances in the 2007 Deodhar Trophy and the Inter-state domestic Twenty20 competition held in April 2007, Pathan was made a part of the Indian squad for the inaugural Twenty20 World Championship, held in South Africa in September 2007. He made his Twenty20 international debut in the final against Pakistan. He opened the batting for India in the match, and scored 15 runs in the process.[2]Following his good showing in the IPL, he was selected for the Indian one-day team. After IPL, though he played all the games in the Kitply Cup and Asia Cup, he got to bat only four times and could not perform well with both bat and ball. He was later dropped from the series against Sri Lanka. He performed well in domestic circuit and impressed the selectors and was selected for the England ODI series in November.
 
He scored a fifty off just 29 balls in the second ODI against England in Indore, on his 26th birthday.[3]Yusuf had made his One-Day International debut for India against Pakistan at Dhaka on 10 June 2008. He became a regular feature of the national One-Day International team, but is yet to make his test debut.[4]Even though Pathan could not repeat his first IPL performance in the second season, he was selected in the Indian team to play the 2009 ICC World Twenty20 championships in England. In the second of India’s Super 8 matches, he made an unbeaten 33 from 17 balls against England. Despite his knock, the team lost the game and crashed out of the tournament without making it to the semi-finals.He consider himself lucky for his rare international debut which came in the final of the ICC World Twenty20 in 2007, 2010 world cup, ipl for rajasthan royals and kolkatta knight riders where his squad won. In late-2009, Pathan was dropped from the limited overs team after a series of unproductive performances. In the final of the 2010 Duleep Trophy cricket tournament, Pathan scored a hundred in the first innings and a double hundred in the second and led his team West Zone to a three wicket win over South Zone.
 
Pathan made 108 in the first innings and an unbeaten 210 from 190 balls in the second innings to help his team chase down a mammoth target of 536. This became a world record for the highest successful run chase in first-class cricket history.[5]On 7 December 2010, Pathan’s power hitting sealed a memorable 5-wicket win for India. Pathan clobbered the New Zealand attack with his aggressive innings, smashing an unbeaten 123 from 96 balls and shared an unbroken 133-run partnership with Saurabh Tiwary to guide India to a huge target of 316 with seven balls to spare and give the hosts a 4-0 lead in the series. He was named man of the match for this effort. The all-rounder clubbed seven fours and seven sixes on the way to his maiden one-day century to help the hosts overhaul New Zealand’s challenging 315-7 with seven balls to spare at the M. Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore.
At the awards distribution ceremony he stated that “this knock will boost my career”. Indian captain Gautam Gambhir said “I have always said Pathan can finish games on his own, and that’s what he did today, I had never seen something like this before. But I knew till the time Pathan was there, we would win the game.”[6]
 
New Zealand skipper Daniel Vettori said “It was a great game of cricket, we were in the game, but Pathan was pretty amazing and took the game away from us.”In the MTN ODI series against South Africa, before the 2011 World Cup, he gave a stand-out performance in a match in Pretoria where he scored a brilliant 105 in 70 deliveries (comprising 8 fours and 8 sixes). Even though India lost the match, his performance was complimented heavily.[7] During this knock, he reached his century off 68 balls which is the sixth fastest by an Indian and the second fastest by an Indian outside the subcontinent. Thanks to his stream of good performances, he made it to the Indian team for 2011 World Cup.[8] and also scored 100 for just 37 balls vs Mumbai Indians in IPL 2010 Though Yusuf did not have a great World Cup, he ended up having the winner’s medal and the honor of holding the World Cup aloft.
 
He was named in the Indian team for 2012 Asia Cup to be held in Bangladesh.[9] He featured in the triangular series in Nairobi-Kenya and played for Baroda’s team against Gujarat and Kenya international where he was honoured by a local fan who said “Yusuf the number one player in cricket after the great Sachin Tendulkar.”

Indian Premier League

After a good domestic season in 2007/08, he was signed by the Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League for USD 475,000 (INR 1.9 crore). In the 2008 IPL season, he scored 435 runs and took 8 wickets. He recorded the season’s fastest half century (from 21 balls) against the Deccan Chargers, and was also the Man of the Match in the final against the Chennai Super Kings.
Yusuf Pathan was named as the vice-captain of Rajasthan Royals during IPL 3. On 13 March 2010, Pathan scored a century off 37 balls, in an Indian Premier League match against Mumbai Indians. The innings also included 11 consecutive hits to the boundary (6, 6, 6, 6, 4, 4, 6, 4, 4, 4, 4).
After that knock where he scored the fastest IPL century, his Rajasthan Royals skipper Shane Warne described his innings as one of the best innings he has even seen in his career and also compared Yusuf Pathan with his country-mate Andrew Symonds as two of the cleanest hitters of the ball.
In the 2011 IPL auction, he was bought for a whopping $2.1 million by Kolkata Knight Riders.

Controversy

On 15 May 2013 Yusuf Pathan became the first batsman to be given out for obstructing the field in Twenty20 cricket while playing for the Kolkata Knight Riders in Match No. 65 of Pepsi IPL 2013 against Pune Warriors India.[10][11].[1]
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